Job Hunt Frustration; Dealing With Job Search Frustration; Emotion; Job Search Frustration; Frustrating Job Hunt; Wellness; Frustrated Job Seeker

The Feeling Of and Dealing With Job Search Frustration

Because of the difficulty of job searching, you know what it means to become frustrated – from time to time – in the job search process.

You apply, apply, interview, apply, and (possibly) interview again – hoping to land a job. The following response from prospective employers, however, is one of silence and rejection despite your best efforts.

Frustrating, isn’t it?

I know how the frustration plays out for you.

Feeling Job Search Frustration

Job Hunt Frustration; Dealing With Job Search Frustration; Emotion; Job Search Frustration; Frustrating Job Hunt; Wellness; Frustrated Job Seeker
The Feeling Of and Dealing With Job Search Frustration
Photo Credit: porschelinn via Compfight cc Edited by Me.

I’ve had a frustrating experience with the job search as well. I’d apply, interview and apply again – only to receive many rejections (instead of the desired result: a job offer).

What I thought would’ve been a short-term endeavor turned into a long-term one.

Who would’ve thought it would’ve taken so long to secure a job offer?

My plan to secure a job offer didn’t happen as quickly as I expected, and I became frustrated in my search to find paid work. I didn’t want to feel this frustration initially, so I continued to push through it.

I felt I had to.

With the passage of time, however, my frustration increased. I knew I had to do something about it.

As my job search dragged on, I accepted frustration as part of the job hunt and decided to keep the following in mind: “…job searching is a process, not an event.”

And, I didn’t deny how I was feeling. Just owned and dealt with it.

I learned to manage my job search frustration, so it had no affect on my energy and ability to move forward in this process.

How to Deal With Job Search Frustration

Check out the 5 ways I learned how to deal with this frustration and consider whether they’ll assist you in managing yours.

1. How Not to Deal: Disown Your Frustration – If you disown – instead of own – your frustration, then it’ll return to you stronger from my experience.

How to Deal: I had to admit I was feeling frustrated instead of brushing it off.

So to you: take a moment to admit it. You’re frustrated with your inability to get a response/interview/job offer.

Upon owning it, you can deal with it (not allowing it to turn into uncontrollable anger) and let it go.

2. How Not to Deal: Hold on to Outcomes You Don’t Control – When you hold on to things you can’t control as a job seeker, you add to your frustration.

How to Deal: However, when you recognize you have no control of the outcomes in your job search, it becomes easier to release this frustration.

In this process, you devote a lot of your time and energy locating suitable positions, preparing your resumes and cover letters, submitting them, reaching out to others, interviewing, etc. Your frustration sets in because you’re doing these things but haven’t gotten the desired result: paid employment.

You must let go of the things you can’t control – responses to submitted materials and rejections, for example. Continue to control the areas you can – cover letter and resume writings and submissions, job interview improvements, and attitude – and give yourself a break from everything else.

Job Hunt Frustration; Dealing With Job Search Frustration; Emotion; Job Search Frustration; Frustrating Job Hunt; Wellness; Frustrated Job Seeker
The Feeling Of and Dealing With Job Search Frustration
Image Courtesy of David Castillo Dominici. Edited by Me.

3. How Not to Deal: Always Check Your E-mail – I’ve said this several times before, but it’s worth repeating here. In the beginning of my job search, I was constantly checking my e-mail because I didn’t want to miss out on any opportunity.

I wanted to properly respond when I received an e-mail needing one.

How to Deal: I had to put an end to this by scheduling times to check my e-mail because I became more frustrated and less productive.

4. How Not to Deal: Engage in an Unlimited Job Search – This is something else I always say here on the blog. Don’t burden yourself with a full-time, full-pressure job hunt.

Why? Because you’ll burn yourself out like I did. I was serious about securing paid work and found it hard to stay away from job search activities.

This was unhealthy for me and is unhealthy for you also. Remember: your well-being is important.

How to Deal: You need a healthy balance between job search activities and other activities. Daily, take time away from job hunt activities to refresh yourself and resume the next day.

This brings me to point 5 (below).

5. How Not to Deal: Disregard Your Need for a Break – When you disregard your need for a break, you’re unable to keep your frustration in check.

How to Deal: One of the best things you can do is take a break from the job search.

Calm down.

Rest.

Engage in another activity, such as journaling, writing/blogging, jogging/walking, reading, listening to music, and/or helping another.

(Note: This doesn’t label you a lazy or unproductive job seeker but a smart one. After taking a break, you’ll return to your search with a clear mind and the energy you need to be productive.)

From Me to You: When searching for a job, you’ll experience frustration. When you get frustrated, remember to: own this frustration, manage it, and push through.

Disclaimer 1: I am not an HR or Career Professional by training. When I write on job search topics, I write from the perspective of a job seeker with experience in job searching.

Disclaimer 2: This article contains outgoing links to the work of Errin Hutkin on the Chicago Tribune website and Catherine Conlan on the Monster website.

P.S. How do you manage your job search frustration? I’d love to hear your response.

Advertisements